Tuesday, 30 July 2013

Cancun has the largest underwater museum in the world

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Cancun has the largest underwater museum in the world. The museum is located at the bottom of the sea is to plug various forms of sculpture with a height of about 9-20 feet. DeCaires Jason Taylor is a major artist of this awesome project under the sea. 
The museum has been developed in conjunction with the protection of the National Marine Park in the Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico.





Cancun underwater museum has about 400 original sculptures of similar size to the reality. All materials used to create the sculptures in the museum Cancun are special materials that do not harm marine life. Cancun Underwater Museum is also promoting the beauty of the coral reefs in Cancun. Cancun underwater museum provides a rare opportunity for divers.

The Cancun Underwater Museum, a ghostly collection of about 400 submerged sculptures, is adding about 60 new sculptures to its already extraordinary collection. Click through and take a swim around the museum without even getting wet.

Cancun is probably best known for its warm weather, beautiful beaches and the bluest water you may ever see.

But beneath those turquoise waves is a popular tourist attraction that is about to get a bit bigger. 

The Cancun Underwater Museum, features a maze of 400 ghostly looking, life-sized sculptures submerged the bottom of a national marine park. In July the museum will complete its final installation of about 60 new sculptures designed to become a new habitat for marine life.

This unique and popular site, which attracts about 750,000 visitors annually, was created in 2010. The sculptures, made of specially formulated, marine-grade cement -- many of which are cast from local residents -- were submerged underwater and placed on the sea floor where divers are free to explore.

The Cancun Underwater Museum, a ghostly collection of about 400 submerged sculptures, is adding about 60 new sculptures to its already extraordinary collection. Click through and take a swim around the museum without even getting wet.
Cancun is probably best known for its warm weather, beautiful beaches and the bluest water you may ever see.
But beneath those turquoise waves is a popular tourist attraction that is about to get a bit bigger.
The Cancun Underwater Museum, features a maze of 400 ghostly looking, life-sized sculptures submerged the bottom of a national marine park. In July the museum will complete its final installation of about 60 new sculptures designed to become a new habitat for marine life.
This unique and popular site, which attracts about 750,000 visitors annually, was created in 2010. The sculptures, made of specially formulated, marine-grade cement -- many of which are cast from local residents -- were submerged underwater and placed on the sea floor where divers are free to explore.
The sculptures are only 28 feet deep in water, with a shallower portion set off just for snorkelers, which means both divers and snorkelers can enjoy the sculptures.
- See more at: http://usa.onlinenigeria.com/travel/62362-cancun-underwater-museum-gets-more-ghostly-figures.html#sthash.fqoECerc.dpuf
The Cancun Underwater Museum, a ghostly collection of about 400 submerged sculptures, is adding about 60 new sculptures to its already extraordinary collection. Click through and take a swim around the museum without even getting wet.
The Cancun Underwater Museum, a ghostly collection of about 400 submerged sculptures, is adding about 60 new sculptures to its already extraordinary collection. Click through and take a swim around the museum without even getting wet. Cancun is probably best known for its warm weather, beautiful beaches and the bluest water you may ever see. But beneath those turquoise waves is a popular tourist attraction that is about to get a bit bigger. The Cancun Underwater Museum, features a maze of 400 ghostly looking, life-sized sculptures submerged the bottom of a national marine park. In July the museum will complete its final installation of about 60 new sculptures designed to become a new habitat for marine life. This unique and popular site, which attracts about 750,000 visitors annually, was created in 2010. The sculptures, made of specially formulated, marine-grade cement -- many of which are cast from local residents -- were submerged underwater and placed on the sea floor where divers are free to explore.

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